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Full text of "Publications of the Cambridge Antiquarian Society"

1 



REN'NOL'-^S l-!lSTORiCA'n 
GENEALOGY COLLECTION 



ALLEN COUNTY PUBLIC 



3 1833 00723 2801 





Digitized by 


tlie Internet Archive 








in 2014 









https://archive.org/details/publicationsofca112camb 




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N? XII. 



ROMAN-BKITISH REMAINS. 
ON THE MATERIALS OF TWO SEPULCHRAL VESSELS. 



WITH TWO PLATES. 



CAMBRIDGE: 

PRINTED AT THE UNIVERSITY PRESS. 
PUBLISHED BY J. & J. J. DEIGHTON, AND MACMILLAN & CO. 
JOHN W. PARKER, LONDON; 



J. H. PARKER, oxford: 



M.DCCC.XLVI. 




o. 

'66 



N. B. In this No. are contained, 

1. Professor Henslow on two Sepulchral Vases, with two Plates. 

2. Explanation of the Plates to Xo. X. Sir H. Dryflen on Roman and Roman- 

British Remains. 

3. Plates three and four to No. X. 

4. Title Page and Contents to Vol. I. 



ROMAN-BRITISH 



REMAINS. " 



ON THE 



MATEEIALS OE TWO SEPULCHRAL VESSELS 



FOUND AT 



WARDEN, CO. BEDS. 



BY 

THE EEV. J. S. HENSLOW, M.A. 

PROFESSOR OF BOTANY IN THE UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE. 



WITH TWO PLATES. 



CAMBRIDGE: 

PRINTED AT THE UNIVERSITY PRESS. 

PUBLISHED BY J. & J. J. DEIGHTON, AND MACMILLAN & CO. 
JOHN W. PARKER, LONDON; 

AND 

J. H. PARKER, OXFORD. 

M.DCCC XLYI. 



1782066 

ON THE 

MATERIALS OF TWO SEPULCHRAL VESSELS 

OF THE 

ROMAN -BRITISH PERIOD. 

BY 

THE EEY. J. S. HENSLOW, M.A. 

PROFESSOR OF BOTANY IN THE UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE. 



In the Archfeological Journal, Vol. I. p. 347, there is a paper by Mr Syden- 
ham, on the Kimmeridge Coal-money, which he has clearly determined to be the 
" waste pieces thrown out of the lathe as the refuse nuclei of rings," which were 
used as armlets, &c. I know not whether it may be considered any additional 
confirmation of this opinion, to mention that a personal friend of my own, who is 
skilful as a turner, upon seeing a specimen of the Coal-money in my possession, sent 
me a piece of ebony prepared as a chuck for his lathe, by way of illustrating what 
he conceived this Coal-money must have been. Upon looking over some fragments 
of Romano-British pottery from the neighbourhood of Colchester, I met with what 
appears to have been part of a large patera, or at least some vessel with a flat 
surface and a shallow projecting rim. This fragment is of the same material as the 
Kimmeridge Cpal-money ; and bears the impression of a fossil ammonite (?) distinctly 
marked upon its fractured surface. Upon drying, it has become cracked and warped 
precisely in the same manner as we see the specimens of Coal-money. 

Upon examining Mr Inskip's collection of Roman-British antiquities, now in 
the possession of the Cambridge Antiquarian Society, I perceived that the two 
remarkable vessels of which an engraving has been made to accompany this com- 
munication, were composed of a bituminous shale, in all respects similar to that 
which occurs in the Kimmeridge clay, and from which the Coal-money has been 
turned. These vessels which were found at Warden in Bedfordshire, are referred 
to in the 10th No. of the Publications of the Society, (page 20), and it is 
there stated that they had been considered to be of oak. I can detect no trace 
of ligneous structure, and it seems to be not improbable that the bitumen may have 
been derived from the decomposition of animal rather than of vegetable matter. A 
faint trace of a fossil impression may be seen on the bottom of the more perfect 
vessel, and towards the summit there is also a sand-gall, or intermixture of sandy 
material, in the shale ; and probably indicating the direction of the strata. These 
vessels have been formed out of separate pieces, as though the bed of shale had not 



4 MATERIALS 01' TWO SKIMJ 1,0111! A I, VlCSSIil.S OF THE II OM A N-IiRITISH PERIOD, 

been of sufficient thickness to admit of their being turned from a single mass. I 
suppose it to be necessary that the axis of the vessels should be perpendicular to the 
natural laminae of the shale, as this appears to have been the arrangement sought 
for in all the pieces of Coal-money I have seen : which always split by natural 
cleavage perpendicular to their axis. Attention to the arrangement of the laminae 
seems to have been as advisable as that which turners are accustomed to pay to 
the grain in wood. 

The Rev. Dr Webb pointed out to me a ring of similar material connected 
with a bronze ring which was so clasped into it that the two had the appear- 
ance of a link in a chain. They were found in this state lying upon the breast 
of a skeleton, at Littlington, and are now among the numerous remains from that 
locality placed in the library of Clare Hall. Both these rings would have been 
considered as armlets, excepting for the above arrangement. Perhaps I may be 
permitted to suggest the possibility of many rings, usually considered as armlets, 
having served as fastenings or supports to the upper part of the vestment. I have 
twice found bronze rings lying on skeletons in a similar position to that noticed 
by Dr Webb ; and in each case they were in pairs, a thick and a thin one to- 
gether. I could not distinctly ascertain whether those of the same pair had been 
clasped into eacli other ; as the thinner rings were much decayed and broken into 
several pieces. If these rings had not served as clasps, possibly they had been 
worn as ornaments suspended round the neck. The green rust on the inside of one 
of the larger rings is singularly impressed with what 1 consider to be the markings 
of the flesh of the human thumb ; as though the individual had died grasping the 
ring, and had been thus buried. These specimens were from the neighbourhood of 
Felixtow in Suffolk. 



WIMMERIDGK COAL MONKY. 

actual siTft. 



Metcalfe * Pianie.r,Lit}u. Co.rKoruiai- 

ELEVATION SECTION 

OF THE KIMMERIDGE COAL VASE. 



DruWN hy HDouiiLes.Esq 3[ctuJfr iltdmer. Zitha CanLbruZtfi. 

(D(D)A]Lm§]Eo 



WALF THE SIZE. 



Explanation of the Plates in Sir H. Dryden's Paper on Roman and Roman- 
British Remains. 



[The numbering of the Plates is unfortunately omitted by the Engraver.] 

Plate I. Fig. 1. (p. 13.) Glass Jug. 

Fig. 2. (p. 13.) Glass Jug. 

Fig. 3—6. (p. 12.) Brass Dish. 
Plate II. Fig. 1. and 2. (p. 15.) Brass Jug. 

Fig. 3. (p. 19.) Glass Bowl. 

Fig. 4. (p. 19.) Glass Bottle. 

Fig. 5. (p. 19.) Glass Bottle. 

Fig. 6. (p. 19.) Armlet. 

Fig. 7. (p. 17.) Flute of bone. 

Fig. 8 and 9. Stone Rings. 

Fig. 10 and 11. Glass Beads. 

Fig. 12 and 13. Stone Ring. 
Plate III. (p. 16 and 17.) Cooking implements and Amphora. 
Plate IV. (p. 20.) Brooch. 



I 



4-' 



PUBLICATIONS 



OF THE 



CAMBRIDGE ANTIQUARIAN SOCIETY. 



VOL. I. 1840—46. 



CAMBRIDGE : 

PRINTED AT THE VNIVERSITY PRESS- 

PUBLISHED BY J. & J. J. DEIGHTON, AND MACMILLAN & CO.; 
.JOHN W. PARKER, LONDON; 

AND 

J. H. PARKER, OXFORD. 

M.DCCC.XLVI. 



PUBLICATIONS 



CAMBRIDGE ANTIQUARIAN SOCIETY. 



I. A Catalogue of the Original Library op St Catharine's Hall, 

Cambridge. By the Rev. Professor Corrie. Price Is. 6d. 

II. Abbreviata Cronica ab anno 1377, USQUE AD ANNUM 1469. Edited by 

the Rev. J. J. Smith. Price 2s. 6d. 

III. An Account op the Consecration' op Archbishop Parker. Edited by 

the Rev. Jas. Goodwin. Price 3s. 6d. 

IV. An Application of Heraldry to the Illustration op various Uni- 

versity AND Collegiate Antiquities. By H. A. Woodham, Esq. 
Part I. Price 5s. 

V. The Same. Part II. Price 4s. fid. 

VI. A Descriptive Catalogue of the Manuscripts and Scarce Books in 

the Library of St John's College, Cambridge. By the Rev. 
M. CowiE. Part I. Price 4s. 6d. 

VIII. The Same. Part II. Price 4s. 6d. 

VII. A Description of the Sextry Barn, at Ely, lately demolished. By 

Professor Willis. Price 3s. 

IX. Architectural Nomenclature of the Middle Ages. By Professor 

Willis. Price 7s.* 

X. Roman and Roman-British Remains at and near Shefford. By Sir 

H. Dryden, Bart. Price 6s. 6d. 

XI. Specimens of College Plate. By the Rev. J. J. Smith. Price 15s. 




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